Everything Wrong with Samrat & Co


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At the risk of upsetting the few but very devoted fans of the film and its hero, I have decided to have a fun but equally harsh discussion of this ridiculous film. It doesn’t really make sense to review it as one can offer few praises and many criticisms. And to review it means to give it some level importance, and that surely Samrat & Co does not deserve.

So what is this largely unnoticed film from 2014 about? It would be an insult to the valuable adaptations of Sherlock Holmes stories, to say that it is one of them. Let’s just say that the film is an amateur and sad attempt to join their privileged class.

Before I dive into discussing things wrong with this film, let me start by commenting what was done well. The background score was very nice. From the very first scene of the film, the background music sets the stage and tells us of the mystery, horror and sadness that awaits. The use of cameras and cinematography was also effective.

Sadly, that’s about all I can mention about what is good in the film. The next scenes introduces us to the most irritating Watson character “Chakradhar” that is to be found. He’s supposed to be a murder TV show host but is a clueless irritating man who keeps making cringe-worthy remarks and unnecessary repetitions of “that’s the point!” that has absolutely no contextual purpose in the dialogue. His voice and facial expressions are just as irritating and instead of being a companion to the “Sherlock” character, he is but a fool whose whole purpose in the story is to praise Samrat and his abilities. Maybe except that he refers to Samrat as STD many times. I don’t even have words to describe this cheap and amateur attempt at word play.

And of course, there is the “Sherlock” character itself– Samrat. Again, it’s an insult to compare this character to the detective sleuth of so many adaptations. This is by far the slowest and most ridiculous detective portrayed. I appreciate the writers attempt to portray a mystery classic, but they failed utterly by assuming the audience to be low witted, easily entertained creatures who have no reasoning skills whatsoever, and who are smitten by cheesy and stupid dialogues.

The Samrat character proceeds to show off his skills with series of deductions in several instances. For example, he makes various claims about Dimpy’s character and life at the first meeting and later in the flight, explains them. He claims that the scratch marks on her phone explain the confusion of her relationship. What utter nonsense! In another instance, it takes our so-called bright detective 30 seconds to figure out that a text message is referring to the break, gas and clutch of a car, what took merely a second for the audience to understand. So much for ‘sharp, teekhi, drishti.’

In other scenes, the writers display the character reaching various conclusions without explaining how he reached them or by giving very poor and illogical explanations. For examples, we’re expected to believe that he is able to read a small writing quite far off from him in a dark, dimly lit room, without even moving his head to look in that direction (when he says the line is from Shakespeare’s Hamlet play.)

What was and has always been so impressive and loveable of the Sherlock Holmes stories and adaptations is that there is always a good, realistic and understandable reasoning behind the deductions of the detective. It’s a true skill that is being put to use, and when it is explained to us step by step, we are able to reach the same conclusion. And yet we are amazed at the speed and efficiency in which the detective reached them. That has always been the secret behind the success of these stories. And one cannot expect an adaptation that lacks this to be successful.

As Sherlock Holmes says in the original stories, “crime is common, logic is rare,”… films are common, logic in films, not so much, as Samrat & Co so well displays.

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Let me leave you with a recommendation of another film, a Bengali film from 2013 called “Satyanweshi” portraying the Indian Sherlock Holmes “Byomkesh Bakshi.” Now this film, despite being a bit too slow, is a revelation in that the characters are extremely well displayed and solve an intriguing mystery. What I love in this film is that it stays true to the relationship between Holmes and Watson. Anindya Chatterjee plays one of the most endearing Watsons I have seen, and is an intelligent character that assists Holmes in solving the mystery, just as it should be. I find the brainstorming discussions between the characters in this film very refreshing.

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