Raman Raghav 2.0 Review


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I do my research. So when I saw Anurag Kashyap’s Raman Raghav 2.0, inspired from a 1960s serial killer in Mumbai, I felt that the filmmaker took too many creative liberties in the script. The film is of course not a biopic and not intended to be. But the story, inspired from real life events, has been distorted and taken in a whole new path. So that at the end of the film, I felt that it was quite something else. Spoilers next…

To dramatize the story and use irony with the creation of a police character who is just as much of a criminal and psychopath as the serial killer is one thing. But to turn a serial killer’s homophobia into love and acceptance is quite another. It was not unbelievable to learn that the policeman investigating the murders of a serial killer indulges in some crime of his own, and ironically using the same method as the man he is pursuing. But it was quite unbelievable that a character, inspired from one who is claimed to have expressed strong homophobic fears in real life, announces homosexual love uninhibitedly. I think Anurag went a bit too far in the galaxy there. What is stranger is that he gave the character such a self-righteous monologue at the end of the film that we understood, and almost even accepted, a ruthless murderer. That’s probably the last thing you want to do when you make a film about a serial killer. Unless one wants to hit home a deeply sub-conscious message that the evil we search for is actually in ourselves? Well, this film would surely be a poor platform to deliver that message. Not even the Cannes jury will get that, let alone the regular cine-goer who is used to being spoon-fed life-altering lessons in the cinema hall. I think Raman Raghav 2.0 is too ambitious, strange and complex for most.

Although the film was made on a limited budget and gave the disclaimer that “this film is not about him,” I think that it does not excuse such a colossal offense by the filmmaker. But all is not bad with the film. The music is out of this world (too far in the galaxy indeed). The contrast of the soothing voice of the singer and the adrenaline rich beat in Qatl-e-Aam, coupled with all too perfect picturization, will put you in a trance. An on repeat one.

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